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Severely Congested Roadways in Hampton Roads Expected to More than Double by 2030

Severely Congested Roadways in Hampton Roads Expected to More than Double by 2030

During your evening commute, you most likely encounter heavy congestion and stop and go conditions for a portion of your trip home.  According to the latest Congestion Management Process (CMP) report, the amount of severe traffic congestion in Hampton Roads is expected to more than double by 2030.
 
The Congestion Management Process ( CMP)  is a continuous process that monitors and evaluates all interstates, freeways and other expressways, principal arterials, and minor arterials as well as some selected collector streets throughout the region.  Roadway congestion levels of service (LOS) are measured on a scale of “A” through “F”, with LOS A representing the best operating conditions and LOS F representing the worst.  LOS E and F are characterized by stop and go travel and severe congestion.  In 2009, 12% of all major roadways in the region were operating at severe congestion levels during the afternoon rush hour, which is anticipated to increase substantially to 29% by the year 2030.

The click on the map image below to view a visual display of severe congestion (LOS E and F), indicated in red, on the Hampton Roads Peninsula and Southside.  The 2030 congestion levels were determined with the assumption that all improvement projects contained in the 2030 Amended Long-Range Transportation Plan are built by 2030.  If transportation funding levels are not sufficient to construct all of these projects by 2030, congestion levels will likely be worse than what is shown.

The final version of the Hampton Roads CMP report is currently available on the HRTPO website.

Congestion

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